Tuesday, September 18, 2007

A visit to Christian Przybilski in Essen, Germany - part 2

Christian is very famos for his common junipers. I know of noone who is able to keep these as healthy as he does. I personally have given up working with them. I have killed about 30 or more. I am in very good company. Just about nobody can keep them alive here. But Christian can. And I have this feeling he does not really know why. Wahtever he tells me sound just like what I do. But he succeeeds, that's the difference.

Anyway these are oustanding common junipers, Juniperus communis, collected in the Alps.
And then a couple of very nice pines.






6 comments:

Anonymous said...

"Wahtever he tells me sound just like what I do. But he succeeeds, that's the difference."

Only one way to find out. One would have to learn on the spot. Like in Japan, where the apprenticeship lasts for up to 10 years. First, one is given a broom for a couple of years. ;) A scary thought...

I would surely want to know what's Christian's secret. I like common junipers. I think the whole bonsai world would benefit from his experience. Could you convince him to write a book or, even better, start videotaping his procedures regarding Juniperus communis as bonsai?

Walter Pall said...

Well, i said it all already. he does nothing special other than taking his time over many years. You don#t seem to believe it. What's the book for then?

I believe he does not have a fungus in his garden that we all have. One day it might get there and then it's over. No need to write a book about that.

Anonymous said...

I don't believe it's fungus. How can fungus discern between potted junipers and the ones in the ground? Those latter don't seem to have problems staying alive.

Aaron said...

In my opinion, when we are talking about fungi etc., there is a big difference between being in a pot and being in the ground.

In the pot is a much more 'sterile' environment for the roots, especially when a good bonsai mix (inorganic) is used). While in the ground there is a wealth of other microorganisms to compete with one another, so infestations/infections are less likely.

Perhaps an analogy to what I am trying to say is growing tropical plant indoors. When inside in this relatively sterile environment they are much more susceptible to insect infections as there are no natural predators around to control the bugs.

This is just a thought, and I know nothing about the fungus Mr. Pall is referring to. But my point is that confining a plant to a pot can bring about some unexpected results...

achim said...

could it have something to do with the different climate ? but then, they are from the alps. one would guess they grow better in your area...which they don´t.

Anonymous said...

In fact, if one believes the books, common junipers are one of the most widely distributed species in the world. In short: they're from all over.